Speak The Mag

Kate Carroll de Gutes

Kate Carroll de Gutes lives in Portland, Oregon in a house with lots of light, wood floors, and a view of the best bridge in the city.  In the evenings, she sits at her great-grandparents’ quarter-sawn oak table and writes long-hand about grief, the drama of dating at midlife, riding bikes, and the joys and challenges of authentic living.  Also, she apparently uses a lot of compound nouns.  Kate’s first book, Objects In Mirror Are Closer Than They Appear, won the 2016 Oregon Book Award for Creative Nonfiction and a Lambda Literary Award in Memoir. Her second book, The Authenticity Experiment: Lessons From the Best & Worst Year of My Life, won an Independent Publishing Award Medal for LGBTQ Nonfiction.

Kate Carroll de Gutes

Non-Fiction

The Authenticity Experiment: Lessons From The Best & Worst Year Of My Life

In 2012, Kate Carroll de Gutes found herself at a rest stop “ruined with anxiety. And when I say ruined, I mean in a car, in hundred-degree weather, with all the windows rolled up, sobbing and crouched in the passenger’s seat rocking and waiting for the Ativan to take effect. I posted on Facebook, ‘Hello, Redding. Dear gods yer hot.’ A funny post that let my family and friends know where I was, but not how I was.” De Gutes didn’t yet understand how insidious social media had become—with pictures of risotto and bike rides, images of nights at the theater—all of it curated to show a wonderful life, regardless of what was really occurring.  But when her editor, her best friend, and her mother all died within ten months of each other, de Gutes could no longer keep up the charade. She began The Authenticity Experiment as a 30-day challenge, wondering if she could be more honest about her days.  She used social media as her new back fence, a place where she could stand and talk to her “neighbors” about the good and bad.  The essays resonated with a wide audience, so de Gutes kept writing, chronicling the dark and the light, and putting it out there for everyone to see.

The Authenticity Experiment: Lessons From The Best & Worst Year Of My Life
Non-Fiction

The Authenticity Experiment: Lessons From The Best & Worst Year Of My Life

In 2012, Kate Carroll de Gutes found herself at a rest stop “ruined with anxiety. And when I say ruined, I mean in a car, in hundred-degree weather, with all the windows rolled up, sobbing and crouched in the passenger’s seat rocking and waiting for the Ativan to take effect. I posted on Facebook, ‘Hello, Redding. Dear gods yer hot.’ A funny post that let my family and friends know where I was, but not how I was.” De Gutes didn’t yet understand how insidious social media had become—with pictures of risotto and bike rides, images of nights at the theater—all of it curated to show a wonderful life, regardless of what was really occurring.  But when her editor, her best friend, and her mother all died within ten months of each other, de Gutes could no longer keep up the charade. She began The Authenticity Experiment as a 30-day challenge, wondering if she could be more honest about her days.  She used social media as her new back fence, a place where she could stand and talk to her “neighbors” about the good and bad.  The essays resonated with a wide audience, so de Gutes kept writing, chronicling the dark and the light, and putting it out there for everyone to see.

Non-Fiction

Objects in Mirror Are Closer Than They Appear

Essays that chronicle some of life's biggest dramas: marriage, divorce, and the quest for the perfect fashion accessory. On the surface, Kate Carroll de Gutes’ debut collection of essays considers her sexuality, gender presentation, and the end of her marriage. But, as editor Judith Kitchen says, “peel it back, begin to take it apart, semantically and linguistically and personally, and it all comes clear.” Kate Carroll de Gutes invites readers to become collaborators in essays about issues we all face: growing up, identity, love, loss, and sometimes, the quest for the perfect fashion accessory. With wit matched by self-compassion and empathy, the essays offer a lesson on the inevitable journey back to the places we all began.

Objects in Mirror Are Closer Than They Appear
Non-Fiction

Objects in Mirror Are Closer Than They Appear

Essays that chronicle some of life's biggest dramas: marriage, divorce, and the quest for the perfect fashion accessory. On the surface, Kate Carroll de Gutes’ debut collection of essays considers her sexuality, gender presentation, and the end of her marriage. But, as editor Judith Kitchen says, “peel it back, begin to take it apart, semantically and linguistically and personally, and it all comes clear.” Kate Carroll de Gutes invites readers to become collaborators in essays about issues we all face: growing up, identity, love, loss, and sometimes, the quest for the perfect fashion accessory. With wit matched by self-compassion and empathy, the essays offer a lesson on the inevitable journey back to the places we all began.